Category Archives: dutch words

a-z culinary adventures

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Arepas are a staple food here on the island. The approach can vary depending on whether the arepa is Venezuelan or Colombian made. I’m no expert on the differences so I will let those who know the most speak for themselves. Venezuelan or Colombian

Bitterballen are fried crispy balls stuffed with scorching ragu. I struggled for a while with these, especially the mystery meat inside. Nowadays, I gobble them down like a true Dutchie. Bitterballen are served with joppiesaus, which is a secret yellow sauce. And these balls are best paired with beer.

Ceviche – It’s another staple on the island, and I’ve found out that is the case throughout Peru and Chile as well. Peru definitely serves up the best ceviche on the planet. Forget Machu Picchu, It’s worth a trip to Peru just for the ceviche alone.

Dutch Pancakes Sweet or savory? My favorites of each are sweet strawberries with whip cream and savory cheese, bacon, and apple.

Empanadas are everywhere in this part of the world, especially Chile. The ubiquitous and savory snack seems to play the role that the taco plays in my homeland of Texas. Much like the taco, it’s prepared with love in a variety of ways, stuffed with everything under the sun, served any time of the day, and always hits the spot.

Funchi is an Aruban food and basically consists of a cornmeal mush served up as thick slick rectangular blocks. It sounds awful, but this insipid slab is oddly satisfying. Our chef at the school where I work prepares funchi often as a side dish, especially when seafood is what’s for lunch.

Guinea Pig, or cuy in Quechua, is usually the most expensive item on a Peruvian menu. It also has a 5,000-year history as a major protein source throughout the Andes. If you dare to order cuy for dinner, it will be presented fully intact on a giant platter, dressed for the celebration and festooned with colorful accessories, including a miniature party hat.

Hagelslag are actually sprinkles, like the kind you put on top of donuts and cupcakes, magical colorful confetti reserved for celebratory occasions. Here in Aruba under the influence of the Dutch, grown-ass adults copiously sprinkle this stuff all over plain bread and butter every day for breakfast. Who needs Frosted Flakes and Lucky Charms when you have hagelslag to pour over your toast in the morning.

Indonesian/ Surinamese cuisine – This is absolutely my favorite culinary discovery of all. I had never sampled cuisine like this until moving to Aruba. Culinary influences mingled when the Dutch brought laborers from Indonesia, India, and China to work on plantations in Suriname. The cuisine that resulted is out of this world delicious.

Johnny Cakes – I confess that I have not tried everything on this A-Z list. Johnny Cakes are next on the agenda for culinary adventures. The journey will take me to San Nicolaas where there is a spot called Saco Felipe, famous for its saco dushi. The saco dushi is a bag filled with plantain, pork chops, ribs, chicken, potato and the johnny cakes. 

Kaassoufflé – It is very clear what is important in this country, convenient and immediate access to large blocks of kaas. You can even find hunks of it at the Chinese store on the corner. Cheese reigns above all other food as king in the Netherlands, and in the Dutch Caribbean. The kaassoufflé is basically deep fried cheese and the perfect snack. 

Locro is a hearty stew served in the Andes. It consists of corn, beans, potato, and some type of meat, usually chorizo. It can also include onion, peppers, squash or pumpkin. I had my first bowl on a very cold evening in Santiago, Chile, and it did not disappoint.

Meat prepared for an asado in Argentina will be some of the best you have ever eaten. I think the asado dinner in Argentina could easily find its way on the top 10 best meals I have ever had in my life. The meat is the star of the show here, but the Malbec plays an excellent supporting role.

Napoleon BonBons Aparte – I discovered these just this week after slowing down to explore all the strange Dutch candy for sale at the supermarket. The taste is strawberry tart, and a fizzy powder escapes from tiny holes as the candy melts in your mouth. It’s a bit of a rollercoaster ride if you can describe hard candy that way.

Oorlog frites – Oorlog is Dutch for war and frites are fries. Put the two words together and you get an edible concoction aptly named war fries due to the anarchy of ingredients piled on top, which includes a smothering of sticky satay sauce, a glob of mayo, and a blitz of finely chopped onions.

Pastechi – This truly is an Aruban essential, especially at breakfast. You can find pastechi on every corner. Another pastry stuffed with meats. Every country seems to have its own version.

Queso con chocolate? Es Verdad? Yes, this is really a thing and leave it up to the magical land of  Colombia to bring forth this heavenly combo. We once ordered the hot chocolate and cheese platter from the room service menu at a hotel in Bogota. Simply drop the cubes of cheese into steamy hot cocoa and use the spoon provided to sift out the gooey clumps that collect at the bottom of your cup. Another place where I found this cheese and chocolate combo was on a menu at a restaurant in Medellin, the arepa I ordered was a sublime savory disc of divinity sent from the gods.

Roti is my favorite thing to order at Indo, which is the restaurant I frequent to satiate cravings for Surinamese and Indonesian foods. In Suriname roti is eaten with chicken curry, potatoes, a boiled egg, and kousenband.

Soursop is a prickly green fruit that grows in the tropics. It’s a scary looking plant, but it makes a refreshing smoothie. I promptly choose the soursop over everything else at the smoothie stand when it is available. It’s supposed to cure cancer, but a compound found in the soursop seed has also been identified as a neurotoxin. Everything in moderation. 

Tamales – In Colombia tamales are as big as your head. Need I say more?

U chocolate letter – It’s Christmas time on the island because Sinterklaas and his Zwarte Piet arrived last weekend. Sinterklaas came by boat, but all his Zwarte Pieten jumped out of an airplane and crossed the border via parachute. Now Dutch children can place their clogs next to the front door in hopes that Sinterklaas will leave a chocolate letter of their first name initial inside their shoes instead of beating them with his twig broom. So if your name is Ursula or Ulysses…

Verkade makes the best chocolate letters because they make the best chocolate. Verkade is a Dutch confectionery that has been around since the beginning of time. There is something to be said for experience; they clearly know what they are doing.

Waffle cookie, or Stroopwaffel, is a waffle cookie sandwich with caramel syrup in the middle. I’ve been instructed to rest them on top of a cup of piping hot coffee for a bit before eating them so that the stroop, or syrup, gets all gooey and melty. It’s good advice.

Xmas cookies – Speaking of cookies. The Dutch bring out special cookies when Sinterklaas arrives. Speculaas are cookies that depict stamp like scenes from the traditional story of Sinterklaas. If the whole season of Christmas could be captured in just one crunch, a bite from of a Speculaas and it’s the perfect combo of all the Christmas spices—cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, ginger, and cardamom—would do the trick. Kruidnoten and pepernoten (small bite-size cookies) also make their appearance during this time of year, usually thrown about the room like confetti. The kruidnoten are sometimes covered in chocolate or mixed with marzipan that depict scenes from the story of Sinterklaas.  

Kesha Yeni is a traditional dish in Aruba. I haven’t tried it yet, which just goes to show that there is plenty left to do on this tiny island. I’ve heard that both Cunucu House and Gasparito dish out the best kesha yeni.

Zoute Drop – Beware of this diabolical Dutch trick. Take pause if offered a piece of candy in the shape of a happy cat or whimsical windmill because these little drop fiends come in a variety of disguises. The Dutch love to dole these out to the unsuspecting non-Dutch. Zoute drop stands for salty licorice and dubbel zoute drop is double salt licorice. The result is a caustic attack on your taste buds, which will cause you to revolt at the putrid taste and spit out the happy cat.

More on drop madness – The Dutch have endless games they like to play with their licorice. They also mix it in with an assortment of gummy candies. These candies are similar to the gummy candies we have in the United States. These people are obsessed with their jelly candies. Again, much like the cupcake sprinkles mentioned before, gummy candies are associated with a certain stage of life in the United States, usually between the periods of 8 to 10 year of age. You don’t see many adults voraciously snacking on a 12-ounce bag of gummy worms. Not the case with the Dutch. I’m not exaggerating when I tell you they have an entire aisle at the grocery store stocked with a mad assortment of this stuff in all kinds of colors and caricatures, from green frogs to red Cadillacs. If it sticks to your teeth and is loaded with chemicals that you can’t pronounce, the Dutch scarf it down much the same way we would chocolate covered peanuts.

Once you take a closer look at the packaging whilst strolling the aisle at the grocers, you will come across a sinister bag of tricks, because the Dutch also enjoy dropping their drops in with the innocent cherry and orange flavors of assorted jelly candies. That or they taint a bag of fruity flavored farm animals by giving them licorice helmets. Just a touch of licorice makes everything taste better? I guess it all depends on the culture and country.

 

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aruba adventures

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Dedicated to friends arriving soon from Texas – a short list of big adventures. It would be even better if I listed directions for each, but that is way beyond my capabilities.  Maybe this map will help. Hopefully, you will get lost at some point because doing so will delightfully lead you on your own island adventure.  I certainly do not claim to be an expert on all that one can experience here. After all, I have only been here for six months. I work all the time, but when I’m not at work, I’m exploring the island—albeit, on a shoestring budget. So here are a few discoveries made. 

Sand  – You will want to spend the majority of your time at beaches. Our favorite is Baby Beach. Drive to the southern part of the island to get to Baby Beach and stop at Charlie’s Bar in San Nicholaas. It closes early because it is in the Red Light District. Also, stop at Zeerovers for dinner on the way home, but only on the weekend, because only then will they remove all the shells, skin, bones, and eyeballs from the heaping baskets of seafood you are about to devour. Many Sundays here have been spent at Baby Beach followed by a delicious catch-of-the-day dinner at Zeerovers. Eagle Beach is named one of the best in the world. Its powdery white beaches and turquoise blue waters will not disappoint, especially during sunrise and sunset. We also frequent Arashi beach. There are more locals there and a drive up to the California Lighthouse after is a nice way to end the day. Another great place for sunset is the Alto Vista Chapel. One more beach worth mentioning is Andicuri Beach. We just had a barbecue there last Wednesday.

Sea – Definitely do some kind of water activity while you are here as well. Snorkeling is the simple, go-to activity if funds and experience are lacking. There are plenty of snorkel spots throughout the island and you can buy gear inexpensively at stores all over the place. There are a plethora of other water activities as well, from kite surfing to kayaking. Also, get out on the water if at all possible. I haven’t been out on a water tour yet, but I heard the Catamaran “Dolphin” tour is the best.

Off-road – There is plenty of activity on land as well. Rent some type of all-terrain vehicle and explore Arikok Park. Be sure you find your way to Conchi, or natural pool. Take the plunge. Just make sure you have on your stylish water shoes.  Spelunk one of the many caves while exploring the park. Quadiriki is my favorite and the setting of an Arawakan legend. There is also a bar/ restaurant in the park called Boca Prins. It’s fun to sit and relax there while enjoying a tall tropical drink and a fantastic view. If you have the time, keep driving along the coast to the California Lighthouse.

Get lost – Somewhere along the way during your time in Aruba it is essential to get off the beaten path and just get lost so that you can experience authentic island life. This will inevitably happen if you turn off any main road because street signs are nonexistent in this country. Don’t worry about it. You are on an island, so how lost can you really get? Eventually, the road will take you to water. Stop any place that looks fun. Explore the aisles of a Chinese supermarket or grab a Balashi paired with a pastechi at one of the many roadside eateries.

Beasties – Designate a day to spend some quality time with animals and insects while you are in Aruba because there are so many sanctuaries that provide serene shelter to a large variety of species, from Howler monkeys to camels. My favorite places are the Donkey Sanctuary and the Ostrich Farm. The Butterfly Farm is also worth a visit. There is a tour guide to educate you on all of the life science moments in case you have forgotten them since 7th grade. We listened attentively as our tour guide described the transformation from caterpillar to cocoon. I was so transfixed that I watched YouTube videos of this process for at least an hour after my visit. I’ve discovered these videos will put you in the exact same meditative state as the Bob Ross’s Joy of Painting series.

Chow down – Sample Suriname food while you are here; order the roti. We like Yanti, Indo, and Swetie. Colombian food is a must as well. There are several restaurants serving authentic dishes. I have only been to Don Jacinto where my friend, who had just returned from a visit to Colombia, emphatically recommended the bandeja paisa. Savory Colombian empanadas can be found at snack stands and food trucks all over the island. Go for Dutch pancakes and order something you don’t typically have with your pancakes. Linda’s Dutch Pancakes is good. There is also a fabulous Dutch bakery in Paradera called Huchada. Sample Peruvian at El Chalan. Finally, we are always on a budget because we are poor school teachers, so if you are looking to splurge, here is a complete list of all the restaurants.

Party – Arubaville, Bugaloe, and Salt and Pepper all have excellent mojitos. All three also have delicious tapas to choose from on their menus.  Arubaville and Bugaloe are waterside spots. Moomba is right on the beach, as in the legs of your chair will sink into the sand. 080 and Chaos are fun Dutch bars to visit where you can strike up a conversation with anyone. I was just at Chaos last night and it appears to be the party headquarters for all the Carnival parades. Order bitterballen somewhere along the way when you are out for the night. Another great location to grab a drink is Casibari Cafe and climb the Casibari Rock Formations.

City streets – Also, I haven’t done much of this because I moved here to get away from the city, but visit downtown Oranjestad. Walk around. Go shopping. Take the trolley. Talk to people. Everyone is incredibly friendly in Aruba. You will meet people from all over the world. This is the best part of living here.

62nd Carnival – Finally, Carnival is scheduled for Sunday when you arrive. I went to the lighting parade last night as a sort of run through for next weekend. I am thrilled to soon be experiencing something new here with all of you.

struisvogel

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I made an appointment with my dentist on a recent trip home to Texas. I had some sensitivity near dental work he did back in May, so I wanted him to check it out and make sure it wasn’t something more serious. Upon arriving, I explained to him that I had moved to Aruba over the summer; still caught up in the red tape of obtaining my work permit, I had not yet been assigned an Aruban doctor and dentist. Mouth agape, oral hygienist by my side ready to retrieve tools on command, I sat back in the chair as he began to inspect the indentations of the surface of my tooth with his tiny steel instrument.

Why is that always the time to strike up a conversation? It’s always the case with these doctors and dentists. Basically, once the probing begins, it becomes some kind of green light to ask you about work, weather, or the upcoming holiday season.

“Aruba,” he began to query, “That must have taken a leap of faith.”

“Uh huh,” I responded as I nodded my head because this was all I could manage.

I was in and out of his office in a matter of moments. Nothing was wrong with my tooth, but the short visit made me realize that it had required much more than faith to pack up everything and leave the country.

Boarding that plane back in July was the crossing of a threshold for me. The ambiguity amplified at that moment is one that most people would never choose to experience unless it was forced upon them, which it had been for me over and over again as I moved through one uncertain moment after another in 2014. The year gave me plenty of practice dealing with situations beyond my control. Some of those very difficult moments didn’t even phase me.

Coming home to a broken window and anxiously assessing that many things had been stolen or destroyed by scary thieves, you gain a lot of practice dealing with uncertainty when you come home from work to find something like that. Scoping out the crime scene all alone as I walked from room to room, I remember thinking, eh, it’s just stuff. Who cares? Other moments were much more profound. Hearing the ticking of the clock while holding my grandmother’s hand as we waited for her to cross her own threshold to the most uncertain moment of all, now that will change you forever. Americans do not talk much about death, which is why I never knew that a single tiny teardrop will fall when the moment arrives. It was the hospice nurse who told me to look for it. I will never forget that moment, “Hippest Cat in Hollywood” by Horace Silver was playing on the jazz station we were streaming in the hospice room because jazz was her favorite music. Watching that teardrop fall across my grandmother’s cheek clearly illustrated for me all that I needed to map out my journey forward.

When it came time to assess what I would keep and what I would sell, the only things worth keeping in my mind were the things that belonged to my grandmother. We loved all the same things in life. Her paintings and books remind me of what really matters. The only things of my own that seemed worth keeping were nostalgic items, pictures, books, and my winter wardrobe. That was it. That was all I wanted. I sold everything else or gave it away to Goodwill. I wouldn’t need the jackets and scarves in Aruba, but maybe I might need them someday someplace on Earth.

I have somehow managed to fill an empty home with what I need to live here in under four months, after arriving on this island with only six suitcases. There is joy one experiences living with less, and finding what you need on a limited budget and with limited resources ignites the creative process.

I finally made my last major furniture purchase, a dining room table with chairs, scouted out at an antique store down the street from my house. The place is like a palace one might come across in a distant land. There are all kinds of nooks and crannies to explore. A petite woman rules over this expansive space, and she likes to haggle and then bark orders at you on how to maneuver heavy, cumbersome objects through tight corridors and down treacherous steep stairwells. My Dutch friend was there to convince me that I should buy a table in the attic space we were perusing because the quality was good and the price was right. After purchasing the table, we both risked our lives transporting it down a winding staircase, but none of us more so than the shopkeeper who would have certainly been killed if we had taken one misstep since she was solitarily supporting the table from below as we precariously made our descent. She insisted we turn the table upside down and slide the top along the incline of the stairs so as to mar the surface even more so than it already had been while crossing the Atlantic from Europe a hundred years ago. “Oil and a rag will smooth the scratches right out,” she insisted.

In addition to a house full of furniture, I also finally have a dentist and doctor here in Aruba which brings me to the finish line of a very long process in international paperwork that began back in March: Many hours spent sitting in government offices in the United States and in Aruba. Costly Fed Ex shipments across both country and sea. The Apostille required from any state where you lived out a chapter in your life story. A series of identical passport photos, which I had to retake because my ears weren’t exposed. Turnaround day trips to and from Austin during visits home to Texas to acquire more Apostille authorization after I was told while living on the island that the government would need a copy of my divorce decree. The whole process seemed never-ending, and it took nearly one year to complete.

Near the end, there was even more paperwork to take to the Aruban hospital to clear me of every scary disease known to man. Only this time I would really be missing that polite, small talk conversation about the weather as the doctors pricked, poked and probed me. After being ordered into a closet of sorts between two doors—another threshold I suppose—I was told to strip down to the waist as the door slammed shut. Moments later, the door flung open on the other side, and a lab technician gruffly ordered me around in Papiamento. I followed orders as best as I could, sheepishly covering myself and tiptoeing across the cold sterile room until I found myself standing spread eagle in front of an X-Ray machine. You know you’ve reached your most vulnerable moment when you are standing cold and naked with your arms above your head in a foreign country.

Thankfully, all the international paperwork is behind me and I finally have the much-coveted stamp in my passport so that I can live and work in Aruba and fly to and from the island hassle-free. My home is finally ready for guests; my first guest arrives on Monday. I am ready to just relax, enjoy, and focus on finding new adventures when I am not working hard during the week.

Today I meet the ostrich, otherwise known as struisvogel in Dutch, and then off to the beach because this is the stuff that really matters in life—meeting big bird and taking a dip in the cool Caribbean Sea.